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THE TEACHERS 
COLLEGE OF 
INDIANAPOLIS 






THIRTY-SECOND YEAR 

1913-1914 



THIRTY-SECOND YEAR 



OF THE 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 
OF INDIANAPOLIS 



ORGANIZED IN 1882 



1913-1914 



ACCREDITED BY 

THE INDIANA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

IN CLASSES A, B AND C 



In the William N. Jackson Memorial Building 

Twenty-Third and Alabama Streets 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/yearofteachersc1314teac 



Board of Trustees and Advisory Board of the Indianapolis Free 
Kindergarten and Children's Aid Society 

1913-1914 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 
MRS. JOHN HOLLIDAY 

Vice-Presidents 

MRS. J. B. ELAM MRS. CLEMENS VONNEGUT 

MRS. H. S. TUCKER . MRS. J. H. BYERS 

Recording Secretary 
MRS. ALBERT METZGER 

Corresponding Secretary 
MRS. JOHN 0. HENDERSON 

Treasurers 

MRS. G. A. SCHNULL 

Indianapolis Free Kindergarten and Children's Aid Society. 

MRS. GEORGE W. HUFFORD 
Teachers College of Indianapolis. 

MRS. EDDY M. CAMPBELL MRS. FRANK A. MORRISON 
MRS. W. W. CRITCHLOW MRS. FERDINAND L. MAYER 

MRS. SAMUEL H. FLETCHER MRS. HERMAN MUNK 
MRS. GEORGE HAERLE MRS. EVANS WOOLLEN 

MRS. JOHN W. KERN MRS. J. H. 

MRS. HORACE WOO] 



ANS WOOLLEN 



Members Emeritus 
MRS. GEORGE W. HUFFORD MRS. CHARLES SCHURMANN 
MRS. JAMES H. BALDWIN MRS. W. E. HAYWARD 

Advisory Board 

JUDGE A. C. AYRES REV. M. L. HAINES 

MR. JOHN P. FRENZEL MR. W. H. H. MILLER 

C. A. GREATHOUSE, State MR. ROBERT I. TODD 

Supt. of Public Instruction MR. LOUIS H. LEVY 

MR. J. G. COLLICOTT, Supt. of MR. THOMAS H. SPANN 

Indianapolis Public Schools MR. W. H. SIMMONS 



MRS. ELIZA A. BLAKER 
President Teachers College of Indianapolis; Superintendent Indian- 
apolis Free Kindergartens. 

-3- 



Faculty and Officers of Administration of the Teachers 
College of Indianapolis 

ELIZA A. BLAKER, President, Philosophy of Education. 

LOIS G. HUFFORD, A. M., English Composition, Literature, French. 

BLANCHE G. MATHEWS, Registrar. 

MARY ECKMAN, Secretary. 

EDITH FOUNTAIN, Dwight Seminary, Indiana Library School, 
University of Illinois.; Librarian. 

JESSIE M. GOODWIN, University of Geneva. Dean, Literature. 

EMMA COLBERT, Teachers College, Columbia University; Prin- 
ciples of Teaching and Method of Graded Schools. 

MARTHA A. GILL, Director of Model School; Method. 

CHARLOTTE GARDINER, Psychology, History of Education, Froe- 
bel's Philosophy. 

ELIZABETH DOWNHOUR, Earlham College, John Hopkins Uni- 
versity; Biology. 

GEORGE W. HUFFORD, A. M., Director of Latin and German. 

CLADYS I. CRAWFORD, A. B., Physiography, History, and Civil 
Government. 

HARRIET E. TURNER, M. D., Physiology, and the Teaching of 
Sanitation and Preventive Medicine in the Public Schools. 

MARTHA B. CRILEY, Bucknell University; Public School Music. 

RENA TUCKER KOHLMANN, Public School Drawing. 

BELLE BOGARDUS, Public School Drawing. 

ANNA FERN, Domestic Art. 

HELEN WALLICK, Teachers College, Columbia University; Do- 
mestic Science. 

CAROLYN PRACHT, University of Pittsburgh, Teachers College, 
Columbia University; Domestic Science. 

RUTH PATTERSON \ 

GRACE ERSKINE DeVERE I Kindergarten Method. 

HAZEL LAPINSKA J 

ELIZABETH BREWSTER, Assistant in Department of Froebel 
Philosophy. 

ALICE BUCHANAN, Teachers College, Columbia University; Book- 
binding. 

JENNIE RAY ORMSBY, Emerson School of Expression, Boston; 
Reading and Expression, and Physical Culture. 

BERTHA A. BENNETT, Indiana University, Posse Normal School 
of Gymnastics, College of North America Gymnastic Union; 
Physical Culture. 

JOSEPHINE McDOWELL, Pianist, and Assistant in Department of 
Music. 

DORA KLEPFER, Vocal and Instrumental Music, Dunning System. 

CE Q RGINA J B A NNERBTT, -*th^i-«nitureHEBttdCTga*teB-if©nmt^ 

MARJORIE FORD) 
LENA STONE V Tutors. 
HELEN WESP ) 

EDNAH BROWN FLEMING, ETHEL HICKMAN, and AMELIA 
BAUER, Assistants in Administrative Department. 



LECTURE COURSES FOR SEASON 
1913-1914 

GEORGE H. TAPY, A. M., Head of Education Department, Wabash 
College. 

STANLEY COULTER, Ph. D., Dean Department of Science, Purdue 
University. 

W. W. CRILEY, D. D., Ethics. 

JAMES H. TOMLIN, Superintendent Public Schools, Evansville, In- 
diana; Concrete Pedagogy. 

JULIA FRIED WALKER, The Rural School. 

GEORGIA ALEXANDER, Supervisor in the Indianapolis Schools; 
Method in Reading and Number. 

CHARLES A. VALLANCE, M. S., Chemistry. 

ADELAIDE S. BAYLOR, A. M., The Graded School. 

NANNIE C. LOVE, Music in Education for Teacher and Child. 

GERTRUDE TUTTLE, Teachers College, Columbia University; Do- 
mestic Science. 

CHARITY DYE, A. B., Chicago University; The Fundamentals of 
Moral Education. 

ANNE E. GEORGE, Graduate of Montessori School in Rome. 



CALENDAR, 1913-1914 

September 9, Tuesday — First Faculty Meeting. 

September 10, Wednesday — Registration and assignment of work — 
all departments, including Domestic Science, Domestic Art, and Ag- 
riculture for Graded Schools. 

September 11, Thursday — Instruction begins. 

September 15, Monday — Jackson Kindergarten and Primary 
grades re-open. 

September 22, Monday — Free Kindergartens and Primary Practice 
Classes re-open. 

October 16, Thursday — Mothers' Clubs, Classes, and Girls' 
Friendly Clubs re-open. 

October 24, Friday — Domestic Training Practice Classes re-open. 

October 30, Thursday — Sunday School Workers' Classes re-open. 

November 5, Wednesday — Normal Classes for Mothers re-open. 

November 26 — Thanksgiving recess. 

December 23 to January 5 — Christmas recess. 

January 5, Monday — New students enter for mid-year classes. 

February 18, Wednesday — Mid-year Commencement. 

Classes in Class A and B work will be formed as follows: On 
September 10, October 1, November 5, January 7, February 18, March 
18, March 31, April 8, April 22, May 7, May 14, May 21, May 28, 
June 3 and June 10. 

On the above dates for A and B classes, special classes will be 
formed for experienced teachers for six and twelve weeks' study. 

May 2, Saturday — Domestic Training Practice Schools close. 

June 5, Friday — Free Kindergartens and Primary Classes close. 

June 6, Saturday — Annual Free Kindergarten Play Fest. 

June 5 — Jackson Kindergarten and Primary Classes close. 

June 14, Sunday — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 17, Wednesday — Commencement. 

June 17 — Alumnae meeting and luncheon. 

Third and Fourth Year classes close on June 19. 

Senior classes close on June 18. 

Junior classes close on June 19. 



EXPENSES 

A limited number of partial scholarships may be obtained for 
fifty dollars per year. 

Tuit ton for other students, per year $85.00 

l'u it ion for rural and graded school work, per year 85.00 

Tuition three years' course for Kindergarten and Primary 

Method, per year 85.00 

Tuition two years' course, Towns and District Schools, per 

year 85.00 

Tuition Class C, third year course 85.00 

Tuition fourth year course 85.00 

Domestic Science, one year 85.00 

Domestic Art, one year 85.00 

Domestic Science and Art, one year 135.00 

Review Course, six weeks 15.00 

Playground Course, six weeks 15.00 

A limited number of salaried scholarships is granted in the third 
and fourth year courses. 

Graduation fee $3.00 

Diploma fee 5.00 

Tuition Class A 25.00 

Tuition Class B, twelve consecutive weeks 25.00 

Tuition Class B, six weeks 15.00 

Tuition six weeks' course for experienced teachers 15.00 

Tuition Public School Sewing, six weeks 15.00 

Tuition Public School Drawing 15.00 

Tuition Public School Music, six weeks 25.00 

Any two of these special courses for twelve weeks 40.00 

Any two of these special courses for twenty-four weeks.... 50.00 

Tuition, Mothers' Classes, per term of 15 lessons 7.50 

Tuition, Sunday School Workers' Class, 15 lessons, a club of 

100 members, each 2.00 

Tuition, Nursery Governesses' Classes, per term of six months 25.00 

Tuition is payable semi-annually in advance. Should a student 
leave the College before the close of the term, tuition is not returned. 

The fees for the use of the library, of a locker, and of the labora- 
tory, are included in the tuition. 

Students in the regular departments are required to furnish their 
own books and materials, the cost of which need not exceed thirty 
dollars for the entire course. One-third of the bill for books and 
materials is due on registration. Students in special courses may 
rent the necessary text books. 

-7- 



THE JACKSON MODEL SCHOOL AND 
KINDERGARTEN 

The Jackson Model School and Kindergerten are departments in 
the Teachers College. 
Tuition Kindergarten children, 3 to 6 years of age, per week. . . .1.00 

(An additional charge of 25 cents per week will be made for all 
children who must be called for.) 

Tuition, connecting class, per week $1.00 

Tuition, first primary grade, per week 1.00 

Tuition, second and third grade, per week 1.00 

Tuition, fourth, fifth and sixth years, per week 1.00 

Tuition, seventh year 1.00 

THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Vocal and Instrumental Music. The Dunning System. 

TUITION 

Piano lessons, term of ten weeks, one lesson per week $12.50 

Dunning System, term of ten weeks, two lessons per week. . . . 25.00 
Vocal, term of ten weeks, one lesson per week 12.50 

CONDITIONS FOR 
ADMISSION TO TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Applicants should be at least seventeen years of age, and must 
give satisfactory evidence of good moral character. They must pass 
a physical examination and bring a certificate of health. This exam- 
ination may be taken after the student reaches the College. 

For admission to this Normal School, applicants must present a 
diploma from a commissioned or a certified High School. Those who 
are not High School graduates must present a certificate of equiva- 
lency from the Indiana State Board of Education. 

Students for Class B must present Class A certificates. Students 
from other accredited Normal Schools are accepted. Credit is given 
for all lines of lecture and manual work which meet the require- 
ments of this school. 

Special attention is paid to courses of work for teachers of ex- 
perience. 

OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE 

Primary classes are conducted in connection with several of the 
Kindergartens; in these the teachers in training may practice under 
the supervision of experienced critic teachers, who are members of 
the Faculty. They have ample opportunity for observation in the 
Public Schools of Indianapolis, in the free and private Kinder- 
gartens, and in the model primary school connected with the 
Teachers College. During the summer term the graded school of the 
Indianapolis Orphan Asylum is used for observation. The vacation 
Kindergartens and public playgrounds offer additional opportunities 
for the study of child life. 

—8— 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The regular curriculum consists of a three years' course for 
Primary and Elementary grade Teachers. In addition to these, op- 
portunity is offered to students desiring supplementary work along 
any of the prescribed lines. A diploma will be granted to students 
completing a two years' course in the Kindergarten department. 

In the Kindergarten department, there are two, three, and four 
years' courses. The fourth year's course leads to a degree in the 
Science of Education. This course consists of advanced work in 
Pedagogics, Experimental Psychology, Literature, French, etc. This 
course is for those who wish to do Normal Training Work. 

The additional academic work required for those preparing to 
teach in the public schools of Indiana will be in the hands of ex- 
perienced instructors. 

REGULAR CURRICULUM FOR KINDER- 
GARTNERS, GRADED AND RURAL 
SCHOOL TEACHERS 

(1) PSYCHOLOGY AND PEDAGOGICS.— A study of mind, and 
the laws of mental development; their relation to nerve physiology, 
and their application to the pedagogics of the Kindergarten and ele- 
mentary grades. 

(2) HISTORY OF EDUCATION.— A general survey of the evo- 
lution of education from the earliest historic times; its relation to 
modern methods and ideas. Also special lectures on the life of 
Friedrich Froebel. 

(3) FROEBEL'S PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION.— An interpre- 
tation of the mother-play, with supplementary readings on child- 
nature. 

(4) GIFTS AND OCCUPATIONS.— A thorough exposition of 
their history and value, with illustrations of their use, and indi- 
vidual experience in class direction. 

(5) STORIES. — Lectures on their sources and values, with special 
training in their composition and narration adapted for Kinder- 
garten, Playground, Graded and Rural Schools. 

(6) NATURE STUDY.— In this course attention is directed to 
the changing phenomena of the seasons as they pass; close obser- 
vation is made of animal, insect and bird life; practical acquaintance 
is gained with trees and the growth of flowering plants and vege- 
tables; suggestions are given as to the beautifying of the school 
grounds and the home. 

(7) AGRICULTURE.— For graded schools. 



(8) VOICE CULTURE.— The course in voice culture will be 
adapted to the individual student. It embraces correct mode of 
breathing; correct position of the vocal organs; articulation, pro- 
nunciation, phrasing, and correct deportment in the delivery of solo 
work. 

The aim of the vocal classes is to teach the rudiments of music, 
and the art of singing according to the present methods of teaching 
music in the public schools. Special attention is paid to rote, song 
and chorus work, and part singing. 

(9) SONGS AND GAMES.— Regular practice in kindergarten 
graded and rural school songs, games and rhythmic movements, sup- 
plemented by vocal training and gymnastics. 

(10) PHYSICAL CULTURE.— I. Exercise in a well-equipped 
gymnasium, including free-standing movements; fancy steps; use of 
Swedish apparatus; games of strength and skill; also lectures on 
the adaptation of exercise to the various ages of children; hygiene 
and physiology. II. In this course mind and body are co-ordinated; 
the body is considered or trained as the expressive agent of being; 
exercises are given for developing health, poise, dignity of bearing, 
good presence, ease of manner, grace, symmetry, etc. A complete 
line of rhythmic work, including Gilbert Aesthetic dancing, is used 
for developing finer subtlety in the body. Attention is given to in- 
dividual defects with special adaptation to individual needs. Lec- 
tures on higher education of the body. 

(11) MANUAL WORK. — Drawing, painting, clay modeling, de- 
signing, paper folding, paper weaving, and all lines of kindergarten 
occupation work; also raffia and reed work, bead designing, ele- 
mentary slojd, and simple lines of constructive work for the ele- 
mentary grades. 

(12) GRADED AND RURAL SCHOOL SUBJECTS.— Lectures on 
language, number, reading and all primary subjects; co-relation of 
the kindergarten and the primary school; adaptation of Froebelian 
principles of education to primary work; nature work, etc. 

(13) SPECIAL LECTURES.— Lectures upon subjects of general 
culture, or practical utility and inspiration to the teacher. 

(14) COMMON SCHOOL BRANCHES.— Arithmetic, spelling, his- 
tory, geography, grammar, and penmanship are taught. 

(15) PRACTICE. — Each student in the regular departments is 
required to practice, under supervision, in the Kindergartens and 
Domestic Training Schools of the Free Kindergarten system. Dur- 
ing the second year, she conducts a primary practice school for a 
limited term. She has opportunity to work in the Mothers' Depart- 
ment of the Kindergarten districts. Systematic training in the mak- 
ing of kindergarten programs is connected with the practical ex- 
perience. 

—10- 



SUPPLEMENTARY COURSE 

Students who have had previous training, and who wish to sup- 
plement such work, may enter this course at any time of the school 
Tear. 



ACCESSORY COURSES 

I. FOR SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS. 

The Teachers College now offers a two-years' course of study for 
teachers of younger children in Sunday Schools. The President of 
the College gives lectures, accompanied by illustration and practical 
example, in the skillful presentation of Bible stories and other stories 
of ethical value; on the choice of suitable pictures and wise ex- 
planation of the same; on child psychology and. such kindred sub- 
jects as tend to the bettering of Sunday School teaching. 

II. FOR MOTHERS AND OTHERS W r HO HAVE THE CARE OF CHILDREN. 

For the aid and guidance of mothers, and any who may have chil- 
dren under their care, a special course has been planned. This will 
include a study of child nature; of Froebel's principles of education, 
especially his Mother-Play Songs; and practical work with such of 
his Gifts and Occupations as can best be utilized in the child's daily 
home life. 

III. A COURSE IN DOMESTIC TRAINING. 

The Domestic Science course includes theory and practice in every 
detail of housekeeping, chemistry, dietetics, and home sanitation. 
The Domestic Art Course covers the work for the graded schools. 
Psychology and Method are included in the above courses. 

iv. nurses' department. 

A Nurses' Class will be organized for giving training to the 
mothers' assistants in the care of their children. The lessons in- 
clude instructions on the right kind of plays for the nursery, on oc- 
cupations, stories, and songs suitable for the little one.^. 

V. PLAYGROUND WORK. 

This course comprises manual work, stories, games, and whatever 
will contribute to efficiency in the conduct of playgrounds for 
children. 

—11— 



VI. SPECIAL SUMMER TEEM WORK. 

(a) A comprehensive course in Domestic Training, including cook- 
ing, sewing, care of dining and sleeping rooms, and whatever belongs 
to ordinary housekeeping. 

(b) Graduates of other schools, and others who desire to do so, 
may receive special lessons in Manual Work, provided they take 
also one regular elective subject. 

(c) Lessons in Vocal Music will be given to any who may desire 
such a course. 

A systematic course in plays for children is given to the students 
of Teachers College, such as is given to professional directors of 
playgrounds. This course is under the direct supervision of Dr. 
Harriet E. Turner, who is a graduate of the Posse Normal School of 
Gymnastics, Boston; a member of the American Physical Education 
Association, and also of the American Medical Association. Dr. 
Turner's experience has been wide as a teacher of gymnastics, as 
well as a worker in organized charities. 

There will be courses in Child Nature, Nature and Function of 
Play, Social Conditions of the Neighborhood, Hygiene and First Aid, 
Playground Movement, the Practical Conduct of Playgrounds, the 
Organization and Administration of Playgrounds. 

THE DEPARTMENT 
OF PUBLIC SCHOOL DRAWING 

FOR THE REGULAR AND SPECIAL COURSES. 

An acquaintance with the material used for drawing. Acquaint- 
ance with the material used for the Applied Arts. 

Landscape work. 

The daily observation of, and the making of, landscapes for irregu- 
lar masses in light and dark, and in color. 

The study of trees for name, form, and public usefulness. 

Free brush work of leaves and flowers. 

Pictorial drawing of animals, birds, and other animate forms. 

Figure drawing for action. 

Color notes from Nature, textiles, prints for harmony of color. 

Type forms in their relation to object drawings, toys, etc. 

Simple construction and free-hand perspective. 

The study of design for lettering, stenciling, handwork, and other 
ornamental purposes. 

Talks upon Architecture and Applied Arts. 



—12— 



LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The library, which contains more than five thousand volumes, 
offers excellent facilities for reference in the various departments 
of study, and in general literature. Upon request, the librarian of 
the Public Library of Indianapolis lends to the school whatever addi- 
tional books are needed for special investigation in any department. 
A number of standard educational periodicals are taken regularly. 



GYMNASIUM 

In the third floor of the building is a large, well-equipped gym- 
nasium, with dressing-room, shower-baths, etc. Exercises in phys- 
ical training are a regular feature of the course. 



NOTES 

Pupils will be required to dress for gymnasium without corsets or 
restriction to free movement of the neck, chest, arms, waist and feet. 
Measurements for dress waist should be taken loosely while the 
lungs are fully inflated. The weight of all clothing should depend 
upon the shoulders. Shoes should have low heels, with broad ball 
and toe measurements. 

Bloomers of material like the school dress may be buttoned with 
the outer skirt to the dress waist (made suitable for street wear 
and loose enough for gymnastics), and the outer skirt removed for 
gymnastics. 

Students in the regular Departments of this College are required 
to study the theory of Domestic Science, and Domestic Art, and to 
practice in the Domestic Training School and Slojd Classes, and to 
work in the Mothers' Departments of the Kindergarten districts. 

The Secretary will, on application, select boarding places for the 
students. 

Good teachers will find no difficulty in securing positions. The 
demand is yearly increasing. The association cannot obligate itself, 
however, to secure positions for graduates. 



—13— 



DETAILS OF DEPARTMENTS 

ARTS AND CRAFTS. 
Drawing, when properly presented, becomes one of the most im- 
portant factors in the education of the child. It brings the home 
to the school; makes the workman a philosopher, and opens the 
eyes of the child to the beauties of nature's secrets. 

The teacher needs ( 1 ) a knowledge of composition for selection 
and arrangement; (2) a knowledge of the principles, for tone balance 
and relation; (3) a knowledge of form for object, animal and life 
sketching; (4) a knowledge of design with which to add beauty to 
the busy work for the child; (5) a knowledge of simple perspective, 
by which the child learns how he sees trees or the road in his 
walks; (6) a knowledge of landscape, for the mysteries of night 
and morning, sunset and noon ; ( 7 ) a knowledge of story-telling 
for the creative imagination of the child; (8) a thorough knowledge 
of material possible to be used in the school-room. 

MUSIC. 

"Let the child hear music and learn to sing, and let him see the 
forms of what he has sung and thus learn musical notation." — 
Foresman. 

I. The song as a basis for musical experience, interpretation 
and use of voice. 

II. The song as a basis for music sight-reading — 

1. Rhythm. 

2. Tone relation. 

3. Metrical values. 

III. Music sight-reading — 

1. Ear training. 

2. Writing music. 

IV. Theory— 

1. Major and minor scales (relatives and tonic). 

2. Intervals. 

3. Triads. 

4. Chromatic effects. 

V. Biography and history — 

1. Famous musicians and compositions. 

2. The orchestra and musical instruments. 

VI. The voice— 

1. Classification. 

2. Its proper use. 



VII. Music, its division into — 

1. Primary grades. 

2. Grammar grades. 

3. High school. 

\ 111. Psychology and pedagogy as applied to public school music. 

IX. Chorus and part-singing. 

Books used — The Modern Music Series. 

ENGLISH. 

The first two courses named are required. At least four other 
courses must be selected by candidates for a diploma from "Class C." 

I. ENGLISH USAGE— A study of the principles governing 
correct use of English in sentences and paragraphs, 
together with regular practice in composition writing. 

II. A STUDY OF POETIC ART— The purpose of this course 
is to develop an intelligent appreciation of literature. 
It will include study of poetic diction, metrical forms, 
aesthetic qualities, structural forms, etc. It will be 
copiously illustrated by selections from English and 
American authors. 

III. ENGLISH PROSE MASTERPIECES— The material for this 
course will be selected from the writings of Bacon, 
Milton, Bunyan, Addison, Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, 
Emerson, Ruskin, Arnold, Lowell, and others. 

IV-V. SHAKESPEARE— The plays will be selected with the pur- 
pose of gaining an acquaintance with the wide range 
and peculiar characteristics of the art of Shakespeare. 
The courses will be introduced by lectures on the 
English Drama before Shakespeare. 

VI. ENGLISH POETRY from Dryden to Wordsworth, with a 
study of the nature of the Romantic Revival. 

VII. Studies in Spenser, Milton and Tennyson. 

VIII. Studies in Shelley, Keats, and Browning. 

IX. Studies in American Literature. 

X. In the Third and Fourth Year Courses, there will be special 
studies in Homer, Dante, Goethe, and other world- 
classics. , 

XI. A course in Mythology. 

Note. — A view of English Literature in its historical development 
will be given in connection with the different courses. 

—15— 



HISTORY. 

For the present, the work in History will be confined to that of 
England and America. It will be given by lectures, topical read- 
ing, note-books, and papers on assigned topics. 

I. AMERICAN HISTORY, from 1492 to 1783. 

II. The AMERICAN NATION, from 1783 to the present time. 

III. ENGLISH HISTORY, to 1603 A. D. 

IV. ENGLISH HISTORY, from 1603 A. D. to present time. 

BOTANY. 

1. Elementary Botany. Morphology of plants; the life history 
of representatives of the main classes of plants; a careful study of 
the higher seed-plants, with experimental work in germination and 
related subjects. Students are expected to collect, identify, and 
preserve easily accessible forms. 

ZOOLOGY. 

The work in this subject will include studies in Elementary and 
Systematic Zoology, laboratory investigation, and observation of 
such types of animal life as are within reach. 

GEOGRAPHY. 
The work in this course embraces: 

1. A study of the more significant facts of Mathematical and 
Physical Geography, special emphasis being given to the earth as 
a heavenly body, its motions, changes of seasons, etc. 

2. An intensive study of weather and climate. 

3. Commercial Geography; the effects of physical conditions upon 
the commercial life of nations; methods of production of common 
articles of commerce; the leading trade routes, etc. 

4. Physiography; a study of the origin and development of land 
forms; the nature of soils; the structure of the earth's crust, etc. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The courses in mathematics will include the usual branches of 
that science which are required in high schools and colleges. 

—16— 



SYLLABUS 

METHODS IN THE GRADED AND RURAL SCHOOL TEACHING. 
I. The course of study. 

a. An organization of material from the child's point 
of view. 

b. A study of materials from the standpoint of develop- 
ment in the history of the race. 

c. The relation between the two. 

d. The teacher an important factor in assisting the child 
to an organization of his experience. 

II. Discussion of methods in teaching. 

a. Methods which have been used. 

b. Motives in teaching. 

c. Motor activity. Its relation to method. 

III. Discussion of method in special subjects — Language, Read- 

ing, Penmanship, Number, History, Geography, Nature 
Study, Manual Modifying work. 

1. Nature of the subject. 

2. Relation to other subjects — co-relation. 

3. Psychological value. 

4. Practical use. 

IV. Types of lessons. 

1. Development lesson. 

2. Drill Review. 

3. Telling lesson, etc. 

V. Writing of lesson plans. 

VI. Practice teaching. 

1. Observation. 

2. Study of children. 

3. Study of curriculum. 

4. Six-weeks' school-room practice. 



■17- 



DIRECTORY OF SCHOOLS AND 
KINDERGARTENS 

Teachers College, northeast corner of Alabama and Twenty-third 
streets. (Take Central avenue car to Twenty-third street.) 

THE FREE KINDERGARTENS AND PRIMARY CLASSES. 

No. 1. Arabella C. Peelle Free Kindergarten, No. 951 W. Michigan 
street. 

No. 2. Christamore Settlement House Free Kindergarten, 1806 
Columbia avenue. 

No. 3. Mary Turner Cooper Free Kindergarten (colored), No. 957 
W. Walnut street. 

No. 4. The Holliday Free Kindergarten, 1329 Charles street. 

No. 5. East Washington Street Free Kindergarten, No. 611 E. 
Washington street. 

No. 6. Mayer Free Kindergarten, corner of West and Norwood 
streets, in Mayer Chapel. 

No. 7. Jackson Kindergarten and Model School, William N. Jack- 
son Memorial Building, corner Alabama and Twenty- 
third streets, a department of Teachers College of Indi- 
anapolis. 

No. 8. Orphan Asylum Kindergarten, corner of Washington street 
and Garfield Place. 

No. 9. City Hospital Kindergarten. 

No. 10. Day Nursery Kindergarten, 518 W. Vermont street. 

No. 11. Board of Children's Guardians Kindergarten, Irvington. 

No. 12. Jewish Federation Kindergarten, 11 W. Morris street. 

No. 13. Brightwood Free Kindergarten, 2341 Stuart street. 

No. 14. Italian Kindergarten, 901 S. East street. 

No. 15. Kindergarten, No. 117 Douglass street. 

No. 16. Woodside Addition Kindergarten, new location to be se- 
lected. 



-18- 



No. 17. North Indianapolis Kindergarten, corner Rader and Twenty- 
eighth streets. 

No. 18. George L. Maas Kindergarten, 2420 Martindale avenue. 

No. 19. Kindergarten, No. 1508 W. New York street. 

No, 20. Riverside Park Kindergarten, No. 1834 Gent street. 

No. 21. Haughville Kindergarten, 521 Germania avenue. 

No. ±2. West Indianapolis Kindergarten, No. 1240 W. Ray street. 

No. 23. Columbia Avenue Kindergarten, No. 1554 Columbia avenue. 

No. 24. Kindergarten, 978 W. Washington street. 

No. 25. Kindergarten, 2374 Oxford street. 

No. 26. George Merritt Kindergarten, No. 418 W. 12th street. 

No. 27. Kindergarten, location to be selected. 

No. 28. Fairview Settlement Kindergarten. 

No. 29. Haughville Slavic Kindergarten, No. 772 Holmes avenue. 

No. 30. Kindergarten, No. 511 W. Maryland street. 

No. 31. Flanner Guild Kindergarten, 875 Colton street. 

No. 32. Boys' Club Kindergarten, S. Meridian street and Madison 
avenue. 

No. 33. Afternoon Kindergarten, 418 W. 12th street. 

Note. — The Teachers College took the lead in the Middle West in 
the Introduction of practical Domestic Training, opening its first 
Domestic Training School in 1889. Within the past eight years the 
same work has been made a feature of the city public school system 
of Indianapolis. Therefore, the Association, feeling that it was no 
longer needed in that field, and that it could expend its means more 
wisely in other ways, has closed all but three Domestic Training 
Schools — one for the training of teachers in the Teachers College, 
and others for practice in connection with Kindergartens Nos. 7, 16 
and 29. 



-19— 



TEACHERS 
COLLEGE OF INDIANAPOLIS 

Education Committee. 

MRS. JOHN B. ELAM, Chairman 
MRS. GEO. W. HUFFORD MRS. MEREDITH NICHOLSON 

MRS. FRANK A. MORRISON MRS. G. A. SCHNULL 

Ex Officio. 
MRS. JOHN H. HOLLIDAY, President of Board of Trustees. 
MRS. ELIZA A. BLAKER, President of Teachers College. 

Endowment Fund. 

Library $9,206.00 

Grounds 9,000.00 

Building 40,000.00 

Equipment 10,000.00 

Alumnae Gift 1,200 00 

Total $69,406.00 

Indebtedness. 

Mortgage on Teachers College building $10,000.00 

Unpaid balance on lots adjoining 1,875.00 

Total indebtedness $11,875.00